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states, florida, iowa, nevada. republicans hold an edge in colorado. democrats are mobilizing their voters effectively. will that trend hold on election day and how much of a difference will it make? i find something fascinating on the focus of turnout. turnout and field operations were the redheaded stepchild of campaigns. all the money, glamour and glory were in tv ad buzz. things started to change. the republicans instituted a get out and vote program that was effective in 2004, particularly. there was a thing called 72-hour project. it was karl rove's project. there was act in 2004. you know, it's funny. people forget when talking independent expenditures. there was a different universe in 2004 on the democratic side that was under 527 as opposed to super packs. it was done independent of the campaigns and largely field efforts. what's amaze sg the status of field increased. i think people are now persuaded in the world of politics of the importance of this. i think it's a kind that represents a change in opinions about how we think of these elections. act was not successf
campaign organizer in nevada to take part in the election. that was five years. in the intervening months my brother has spent every single day working for the obama campaign. he's worked in eight states, at times literally living out of clothes in trash bags while putting 87,000 miles on a beat up old white ford pickup truck. 60 to 90 hours a week 52 weeks a year for five years. then from his perch as a nevada state director this time around to get him re-elected. i'm biased, of course, but to me tuesday's victory was luke's victory as much as it was anyone else's. luke and the thousands like him, organizers of every hue and background and creed in states across the nation working pre'strously long hours and making democracy work, calling people, knocking on doors, sending e-mails, sitting through endless meetings and conference calls and sorting columns on spreadsheets and buying office spliets in bulk or slightly used so as to come in under budget. negotiating leases, getting yelled at by people, there were thousands of people across the country like my brother doing this work, and not
, young people flying to arizona, to nevada, working side by side to build this country back up. not just hard infrastructure, but working in day care centers, child care centers. this could be a generation-defining thing that would be more economically efficient than putting people back to work. >> just to take all the toy out of the idea of us think being a progressive future. the reality is the last time that we did an attack on the economic problem, the economic crisis, governors were given money, right, in the stimulus. but what did most of them do? they reduced their public sector work force. most of the job decline has been because governors, states directly -- >> so did the federal government. >> but wait, wait. that was after the stimulus money wore out. the stimulus money that was given to states and local governments, about $240 billion kept local -- public servants at work, kept governments from laying off people, kept governments fixing the potholes. and that wore out, we didn't replace it. >> but at the federal level, we had also reductions in the federal work force. we're g
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3